Access Real Estate specializes in San Carlos, CA single family homes, residential & commercial real estate, and peninsula investment properties from the Dumbarton to the Golden Gate. Access your Bay Area real estate advantage!
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from peterspear  3 notes
peterspear:

PEN Surveillance Metaphor Mapping Project via

As security expert Bruce Schneier has observed, people “tend to base risk analysis more on stories than on data. Stories engage us at a much more visceral level, especially stories that are vivid, exciting, or personally involving.” Choose the wrong story, and you can overstate the risk. This means journalists should be vigilant in deciding which literature should serve as metaphors.

peterspear:

PEN Surveillance Metaphor Mapping Project via

As security expert Bruce Schneier has observed, people “tend to base risk analysis more on stories than on data. Stories engage us at a much more visceral level, especially stories that are vivid, exciting, or personally involving.” Choose the wrong story, and you can overstate the risk. This means journalists should be vigilant in deciding which literature should serve as metaphors.

Reblogged from goodideaexchange  30 notes

We assume that this will be a century of technology. But if the competition in tech moves to this new battlefield, the edge will go to those institutions that can effectively employ imagination, metaphor, and most of all, storytelling. And not just creative writing, but every discipline in the humanities, from the classics to rhetoric to philosophy. Twenty-first-century storytelling: multimedia, mass customizable, portable and scalable, drawing upon the myths and archetypes of the ancient world, on ethics, and upon a deep understanding of human nature and even religious faith. By Michael Malone. “How to Avoid a Bonfire of the Humanities” (via peterspear)

Silicon Valley Close to Cracking REALTOR Code?

What’s lost in the ongoing debate of whether or not #Realtors “deserve” their commission or are even needed at all, misses one important point. Realtors are and continue to be the integral, human foundation of the real estate and housing industry.
Buyers and sellers in a #realestate transaction tend to only look at the commission and how much a Realtor is getting paid from the standpoint of their current transaction and the money they could theoretically be saving at either end. It’s understandable for them to do this. They are seeking the best value or greatest profit at the moment they are buying or selling a home. What’s overlooked is that without Realtors, the real estate market would lack the foundation needed to determine those prices, regardless of who eventually aggregates and uses the info, whether it is mega websites, appraisers, courts, or attorneys. The benchmark for the data they use is the sale price, plus standard cost and commissions for the area, expertly ascertained by the local Realtor. They are, in essence, not only being paid for their valuable time, expertise and service in any single transaction but also for bringing whatever degree of financial stability exists to the real estate market with every transaction.
For example, what determines if a property should sell for $200,000 or $800,000? Without the accurate data, being submitted to hundreds of multiple listing services across the country, the frame of reference to reliably establish value would not exist. Where, or more importantly who, does this data come from? This data is compiled and submitted by the thousands of Realtors across the country. 
Realors serve another vital purpose as well, especially on the local level. Other than the “location, location, location” keyto value, properties vary in design, construction, amenities and neighborhood “walking score.” All of which impact value and pricing. Experienced, local Realtors not only know how all of these factors figure in to arriving at the most accurate, comparable value price but they also have working relationships with fellow Realtors which can play a vital role in having an offer accepted as well as facilitating win-win negotiations for their buyers and sellers during the transaction.
Along with the comfort and security of an experienced and licensed person walking you through one of the most significant and emotional moments in your life, the above factors are uniquely human intangibles that cannot be replaced by an algorithm. Although “cracking the Realtor code” has and will continue to be attempted at #SiliconValley incubators right down the street! Put in yesteryear’s early cyber terms: each closed transaction, completed by a Realtor, adds solid, reliable “bits of data,” ones and zeroes, to bring both tangible and intangible value to everyone in the real estate industry network, including and most importantly, our incredible clients.
— William Curry, April 8, 2014 Access Real Estate

GOT DRONES?

The next time you look up into the sky, someone up there might be looking back at you and it’s not Jeff Bezos! From the ground, up to 400 feet above, it is perfectly legal for any individual to fly a camera equipped drone over your property. While reserving judgment as to whether or not this is a positive development or productive use of technology,my interest as a REALTOR® is how this will impact my clients and their housing needs. Included within my clients’ needs and expectations is that I have a complete understanding of how the technology will affect the real estate and construction industries at large.
 
As REALTORS®, we have to stay ahead of the trends in order to help our clients make the best decisions on the buying and selling of their home before, during and after the property transaction. With that emphasis in mind, here are some insights and observations regarding the new developments in drone technology, the lower costs to purchase drones and the coming wave of drones in our skies.
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It has been our experience representing buyers and sellers throughout Silicon Valley, that our clients place a premium value on their privacy. They not only demand confidentiality and anonymity within their transaction but privacy within their home and on their property. The advent and proliferation of inexpensive, easy to operate camera drones can provide challenges in this area. 

The first place to begin safeguarding your privacy against the drone’s invasive lens would be at what can be referred to as the “eyes of your home:” the windows. Everyone loves an expansive view that inspires their soul and lets them keep an eye on the little ones but a great way to enjoy these benefits while protecting one’s privacy is to make your windows a one-way view. This can be accomplished by having the windows tinted or having factory-made tinted windows installed. A canopy over the window or window area is another way to thwart the drone’s prying eyes, as it forces the drone to change its angle.
In keeping with the canopy strategy: doors, decks, and patios should have some type of overhangs as well. Awnings work well for the doors, and simple table umbrellas or a couple of resort styled cantilever umbrellas can work for the patio and decks. Finally, taking advantage of nature’s own “canopy” can provide added value to any home in the near future as trees and landscaping on a property work wonders to enhance privacy. It is quite possible that nothing provides better cover from drones overhead than a canopy of leafy trees.
No single method will be full-proof in protecting against the drone camera but the future of real estate design and home purchases themselves will undoubtedly adjust to this new drone reality. While this Blog entry may be a little ahead of its time, Bay Area home designers, home owners and home buyers that take the coming advances in technology and drone proliferation into account in their features and upgrades might command a value added premium in their residential neighborhood.
— William Curry, April 1, 2014 Access Real Estate
Reblogged from goodideaexchange  69 notes
goodideaexchange:

The boxer
We are creating a generation of people so sheltered from real world catastrophes and failures, that they will never be able to attempt the nearly-impossible and will be afraid to ever risk anything. We celebrate those who risk and win, but humiliate those who risk and lose. It’s like we’ve sheltered this promising generation in a clear, protective bubble in which they can view the world, but never fully connect with it, because interacting with this world could lead to disappointment, resentment and hurt feelings. And, yet, it’s those negative results that spur us to try harder, think things over again and become better to meet the challenges of our day.
It’s like a boxer who trains hard to be a world champion. Some of the best lessons the boxer will ever learn will come from getting hit square in the jaw, feeling his/her knees buckle and crumbling to the canvas in utter defeat. The boxer’s lesson? When your opponent throws that kind of punch, you duck.  Also, when your opponent throws that kind of punch, see how your opponent left him/herself open, because every time a boxer throws a powerful punch, the fighter leaves him/herself open for a brief moment.
We’re training a generation of people to fight with feathers, with the only penalty of defeat being a tickle to the nose. Some of the best lessons you can learn come from being hit with a boxing glove full of a cement-like fist, crashing into your nose and unleashing a gusher of crimson blood. We’d all like to be like Muhammad Ali, floating like a butterfly, stinging like a bee. But even he got creamed a bunch of times and fell to the canvas. Mike Tyson was tough, but he also got knocked out eventually.
We don’t crown pillow fight champions like boxing champions, because the boxer actually risked a severe beating to earn his/her crown. Don’t be afraid to step in the ring. Don’t be ashamed to be knocked out. Champions don’t just train hard, they get hit hard, too. They’re not champions because they never got hit, they’re champions because they didn’t quit after they got hit.

goodideaexchange:

The boxer

We are creating a generation of people so sheltered from real world catastrophes and failures, that they will never be able to attempt the nearly-impossible and will be afraid to ever risk anything. We celebrate those who risk and win, but humiliate those who risk and lose. It’s like we’ve sheltered this promising generation in a clear, protective bubble in which they can view the world, but never fully connect with it, because interacting with this world could lead to disappointment, resentment and hurt feelings. And, yet, it’s those negative results that spur us to try harder, think things over again and become better to meet the challenges of our day.

It’s like a boxer who trains hard to be a world champion. Some of the best lessons the boxer will ever learn will come from getting hit square in the jaw, feeling his/her knees buckle and crumbling to the canvas in utter defeat. The boxer’s lesson? When your opponent throws that kind of punch, you duck.  Also, when your opponent throws that kind of punch, see how your opponent left him/herself open, because every time a boxer throws a powerful punch, the fighter leaves him/herself open for a brief moment.

We’re training a generation of people to fight with feathers, with the only penalty of defeat being a tickle to the nose. Some of the best lessons you can learn come from being hit with a boxing glove full of a cement-like fist, crashing into your nose and unleashing a gusher of crimson blood. We’d all like to be like Muhammad Ali, floating like a butterfly, stinging like a bee. But even he got creamed a bunch of times and fell to the canvas. Mike Tyson was tough, but he also got knocked out eventually.

We don’t crown pillow fight champions like boxing champions, because the boxer actually risked a severe beating to earn his/her crown. Don’t be afraid to step in the ring. Don’t be ashamed to be knocked out. Champions don’t just train hard, they get hit hard, too. They’re not champions because they never got hit, they’re champions because they didn’t quit after they got hit.

Did You See the Fence?

One of the most interesting items frequently given the “short end of the stick” in Silicon Valley real estate, are fences. This is understandable in the sense that they are not shining with “wow factor” like the kitchen, or home theater or even a “man cave.” In addition to this, the style of fencing tends to change as it is runs along the border of a property.
The fence can start off with brand new redwood at one property line, give way to worn material of an undetermined type on the other, and end with concrete or cinder block along the rear yard. All on the same property! How does this sort of thing happen? Simple, each owner has put in a new fence when the fence was in need of repair or replacement. Typically, any given home is bordered by three different properties and hence, three or four different fences.
Want to have all your fences match? This is made possible by a new California law that has come into the picture (See: Cal. Civil Code § 841).  Starting January 1, 2014, a property owner can build a new fence upon giving the adjoining neighbors thirty days notice that a new fence will be installed. The law operates on the idea that adjoining owners share equal responsibility of shared fences.
When considering the purchase or sale of you next property, make sure your REALTOR® checks into how improving its fences can increase your home’s curb appeal, family safety and ultimate value.
— William Curry, March 18, 2014